Patrick Morrow

Patrick Morrow

Patrick Morrow didn’t find his high school classes challenging enough.

Math class, for example, alternated weeks of learning concepts with lengthy review periods – and Morrow wanted to progress more quickly. His mother learned about SUNY Broome’s Early College program after speaking with Professor Victor Lamoureaux, and Patrick eagerly applied.

The Vestal resident is now attending college full-time and expects to transfer to Clarkson University as a full junior next fall.

The Early College program gives high school students the opportunity to take classes at SUNY Broome, on campus or online, before graduating high school. It is typically for seniors and juniors who are at least 16 years old, and have maintained a high school course average of 80 or higher related to the college course they seek to take.

Learn more about Early College.

“I would recommend it to everybody who is excelling in high school and their classes, and feel that they need more,” Morrow said. “It’s not for everyone, though. Some people need the high school experience to use college to the fullest.”

Through self-study, Patrick recently passed the CLEP calculus exam, which allowed him to place into Calculus 2 as well as take second-year engineering courses. An Engineering Science major, he truly enjoyed taking a course on computer-assisted design (CAD) with Professor Joe DeAngelo, and he’s currently studying physics, German, C++ computer programming in addition to his calculus class and other courses.

In short, he’s finally learning at the speed he wants – and excelling.

Patrick Morrow

Patrick Morrow

Learn more about our Engineering Science program.

He finds many of his professors approaching and understanding, he said. At 17, it can feel a little odd to be among the youngest members of class, but mostly his fellow students don’t notice his age.

Patrick has stayed after class to help his peers master concepts, and recently signed up to become a peer tutor in math, German and physics. He enjoys helping other students, he said.

Long term, he plans on going into the military – he’s leaning toward the Marines – and using his engineering skills there, whether in aerospace or as a combat engineer. After that, he plans to pursue an career at a firm such as BAE Systems, Boeing or Lockheed Martin.

This high-flying Hornet has the following advice for students looking to make the most of their college education: “Talk with your professors and connect with them,” he said. “If you’re struggling, don’t try to figure it out on your own.”